Moline Memories - MHS 66 Friends






Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Rest in Peace - Jeff Quick's Mother

Eileen Quick


Eileen Helen Quick, 94, of Moline, died and went to be with her Lord on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015, at the Clarissa C. Cook Hospice House, Bettendorf.
Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday at All Saints Episcopal Church, 2420 41st St., Moline. Visitation is 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday at Wheelan-Pressly Funeral Home, Rock Island. Burial is at the National Cemetery, Arsenal Island, with a luncheon to follow at the church. Memorials may be made to All Saints Episcopal Church or to the Wounded Warrior Project.
Eileen was born June 2, 1921, in Norwood, Ohio, the daughter of Oliver Benjamin Huber and Lena Knouer Huber. Eileen graduated from Norwood High School in 1939. On May 25, 1946, she married the love of her life, R. Perry Quick in Norwood. She met Perry while he was on leave from Camp Atterbury in Indiana, where he was stationed prior to being sent overseas during WW II. After their marriage they settled in Moline and raised their family.
She worked in the law office of Trevor & Schweibert until the birth of her first child. In 1957, she began to work for the city of Moline in the Parks and Recreation Department. She retired from there in 1985. After their retirements, Eileen and Perry loved to travel to Myrtle Beach, Door County and to visit family and friends. They loved to get together with friends and play cards and go dancing.
Eileen served on the board of trustees at Friendship Manor and the Rock Island City Union of King's Daughters. She was also a member of the Moline Pilot Club and the Victory Circle of King's Daughters since 1953. She was also very active in her church and was a member of the Altar Guild, St. Anne's / Vestment Guild, St. Elizabeth's Guild and Triangle Club. She also received the Holy Order of the Trinity for her church work. She will be dearly missed by all the friends she has made through the years.
Survivors include sons and daughters-in-law, Jeffrey A. and Penny Quick of Moline, Lawrence R. and Susan Quick of St. Ann, Mo. Her grandchildren are Christopher M. Quick (Meredith) of Palatine, Ill., Chad M. Quick of Moline, and Cyndi Quick of Overland, Mo. Great-grandchildren include Marianne, Sarah and Christa Goers, Madeline, Christopher and J.J. Quick. Also, her brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law, Dr. William and Janice Jernigan, Columbia, Tenn., and William and Eleanor Quick, South Dakota. There are also many loving nieces, nephews and great-nieces and great-nephews. She was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Perry in 2001, her parents, two sisters, Erma and Pat, one brother, Wilson, and grandson, Jeffrey A. Quick Jr.
Special thanks to all who helped care for Eileen at the end, Unity Point West, Rosewood Care Center, Clarissa C. Cook Hospice, but most especially to Father Laurence and Betty Larson for their loving kindness, friendship and spiritual guidance.

Online condolences may be left at wheelanpressly.com.

Rest in Peace, Jane Laughead VanHyfte



Jane M. Laughead VanHyfte, 67, of Alexis, passed away Friday Oct. 2, 2015, at home.
A Celebration of Life will be held Thursday, Oct. 8, from 11 a.m. till 1 p.m. at the Viking Club 1450 41st St., Moline. Burial will be held at a later date. Please sign the online guestbook atwisefamily-hooverhall.com. Wise Family - Hoover Hall Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements.
Jane was born Feb. 17, 1948, in Rock Island, the daughter of Robert and Harriet Laughead.
After graduating from Moline High School she worked at the Rock Island Arsenal, later transferring to White Sands facility in New Mexico before returning to the Quad-City area. Jane's real passion was in the art field, creating jewelry, drawings and ceramics.

Surviving are her mother, Harriet Laughead Bealer, East Moline; special friend, Kent Mohr, Alexis; and several nieces and nephews. Jane was preceded in death by her father, Robert Laughead, two brothers, Dan Laughead and Richard Laughead and a nephew, Joe Laughead.

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Viet Nam Vet John Katherman Married My Neighbor Across the Alley - Darlene Gabriel

Like most men who go to war, Coal Valley’s John Katherman felt lucky to get out alive. On his first day in Vietnam, he met another soldier who told him, “I’m lucky, no Purple Heart.
“I wasn’t real thrilled to hear that. I then saw the guy I was going to replace, (and) he’d been shot seven times.
“I was very lucky, because the squad I joined was full of experienced guys. They knew what to do.”
One thing the squad did not do was use drugs.
“There was a drug problem in Vietnam, and a lot of guys got shot because they were high. My squad followed the rules: No drugs.”
Katherman's luck continued.
Sitting in the field, reading his hometown newspaper, he encountered a lieutenant who also was from Moline.
“I eventually became his radio guy, which was safer, because I wasn’t at the front of our patrols,” he said.
When the lieutenant took a position farther back at battalion headquarters, he arranged for Katherman to go with him.
“So, I was out of the bush,” he said.
More luck came.
When Katherman returned from a break to Hawaii with his high-school-sweetheart-turned-wife, Darlene, he learned that his lieutenant had died in a non-combat helicopter crash.
“If I had been there instead of in Hawaii, I’d have been with him and died," he said.
Katherman said some of his good fortune had nothing to do with luck, and he “saw tremendous leadership when under fire, and a lot of us are alive today because of those commanders.
“One black night, we were out on patrol, and our pucker factor was high. I had to wake a guy up who was in the middle of a bad dream and woke up screaming. Our cover was blown, so we were told to shoot off all our ammunition, and luckily, no one shot back. We walked back with our hands on the shoulder of the guy in front of us, it was so dark.”
Vietnam changed him.
“I came back much more mature and centered. I grew up a bunch over there, facing life or death. It made me appreciate our freedoms, our Constitution that gives us our great life. The Vietnamese have never had it.”
Like the men who left Vietnam before him, Katherman didn’t want to jinx his last day. As he and the others boarded the plane for the States — the plane that just brought in fresh troops — not a word was spoken. And no one said a word as the plane took off.
Not until the flight leveled off did all the troops break out into a chorus of “Leaving On a Jet Plane.”

---

Very good article featuring my dad, John Katherman, who was drafted into the Army and sent to Vietnam. There are so many things to say about my dad. He is my hero and words cannot express how proud i am to be his son. While I do believe in incidents of "luck", I also believe in God and the concept of "Actual Grace". I'm eternally thankful for his life which brought life to me and my twin brother, Jeff, and his safe return to a productive and fruitful life post Vietnam. i love you, Dad!

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Rest in Peace - Principal Paul Hoff - Coolidge Junior High

Paul Hoff


Paul L. Hoff, 93, of Moline, IL, died Thursday, August 13, 2015, at Genesis Medical Center – Illini Campus. Per his wishes, cremation rites have been accorded. A memorial service will be held Saturday, August 29th, at 11:00 a.m., at First Congregational Church, 2201 – 7th Avenue, Moline. 

Inurnment will be in Hampton Cemetery in Hampton, IL. Memorials may be made to First Congregational Church, the Boy Scouts of America, or to the donor’s choice. Paul Lester Hoff was born in New Windsor, IL, on July 22, 1922, to Charles and Melissa (Congleton) Hoff. On July 18, 1945, in Canton, MO, he married Annell Bernice Ellis, who preceded him in death February 22, 2009. Paul graduated from the former East Moline High School, and from Culver-Stockton College in Canton. 

He received his Master’s Degree in Education at the University of Iowa. He served in the U.S. Army in the European Theater during WWII. Paul was a teacher and coach at Fairview Community High School in Fairview, IL, for two years before coming to Coolidge Junior High School in 1948, to teach and coach 10th grade football and basketball. He was assistant principal for five years, becoming principal in 1961. 

He retired in 1981 after 33 years. He was a member of First Congregational Church in Moline, and held many different offices there. He was a member of the Moline Kiwanis Club since 1955, a member of American Legion Post #246 of Moline, a member of the Blackhawk Retired Teachers Association, and the Illinois State Retired Teachers Association. He was awarded the Silver Beaver Award during his years as a Boy Scout Leader. He enjoyed working in his yard and gardening, and loved being with his family. Survivors include a son, Curtis (Tawnya) Hoff of East Moline; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. In addition to his wife, he was preceded in death by his parents, one sister, Elva Dailey, and three brothers, Chuck, Clyde, and Larry Hoff.

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Rest in Peace, Billie Seesland's Father, WWII Veteran, Aged 97

William Seesland


William H. "Bill" Seesland, 97, a longtime Moline resident, passed away Friday, June 5, 2015, at Clarissa C. Cook Hospice House, Bettendorf.
A celebration of life will be at 11 a.m. Thursday, June 11, at First Congregational Church, 2201 7th Ave., Moline. Visitation with the family will be 3 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 10, at Wendt Funeral Home, Moline. Burial at Rock Island National Cemetery, Arsenal Island, will take place at 10 a.m. Friday, June 12.
Bill was born Nov. 18, 1917, at Camp Logan, Houston, Texas, to Eileen (O'Reilly) and Glen J. Seesland. Bill's father, an officer in the 132nd Illinois Infantry, was serving under General Pershing, who was attempting to capture Pancho Villa.
Bill grew up in several locations because of the early death of his mother, living with relatives in Chicago, Detroit, Mich., Sycamore, Ill., and Juda, Wis. Perhaps this is how he developed his skill in dealing with people and, despite adversity, a positive attitude to life. He attended Northwestern University in Evanston and Centre College in Danville, Ky. In October 1942, he enlisted in the Aviation Cadet Program. He was called to active duty in January 1943 and went overseas in January 1945, joining the 487th Squadron of the 352nd Fighter Group at Chevres, Belgium. His main base was Bodney, England, flying the P-51 Mustang and earning the rank of captain.
Bill and his wife, Alberta "Billie," moved to Moline in 1946 to raise a family and work for Deere & Co., retiring in 1980. Married since 1939, Bill and Billie enjoyed retirement visiting Alaska, Panama Canal, Europe and Africa. He was also an avid golfer and tennis player. In 2008, Bill flew on the Q-C Honor Flight with daughters, Eileen and Bonnie. An enthusiastic advocate of the Moline Fire Department, he was a founding member of the Moline Second Alarmers in the early 1950s. In November 2007, Bill was made an honorary member of Fire Fighter's Union 581. Sunday mornings might find him enjoying a cup of coffee with his firemen friends and sharing his wit and humor in the conversation.
Bill is survived by his three daughters, Bonnie Tyler, Washington, D.C., Billie Brewer, Moline, and Eileen Hoegner, Moline; and his granddaughter, Darcy Tyler, Seattle, Wash. He was preceded in death by wife, Alberta, in 2013; and sons-in-law, Curtis P. Hoegner and Jerry L. Brewer.
The family requests no flowers. Instead, donations are suggested to Clarissa C. Cook Hospice House, 2546 Tech Drive, Bettendorf, IA 52722; or Living Lands & Water, 17624 Illinois 84 N., East Moline, IL 61244; or do something for yourself that makes you happy.

Online condolences may be expressed at wendtfuneralhome.com.

Monday, June 8, 2015

Happy 48th Anniversary - Rex and LaWanda Bullock


Rex: 'Today, 48 years ago 2 kids faced 2 preachers ( our fathers) and said "I do." We really had no idea what all that meant, but 48 years later we're still together and we're still in love. LaWanda, you're still the most beautiful girl in all the world and you're MINE. Happy Anniversary! Let's keep saying "I do."





Monday, June 1, 2015

Rest in Peace, Jack Dye

Jack Dye, MHS teacher


Visitation will be 3 to 8 p.m. Thursday, June 4, in the Horizon Room at Trimble Funeral Home at Trimble Pointe, 701 12th St., Moline. Services to mark a life well-lived will be at 11 a.m. Friday at First Congregational Church in Moline, with the Rev. Craig Jan-McMahon officiating. Interment will follow at Moline Memorial Park. Memorials may be made to the Jack Dye Scholarship Fund at Moline High School.
Jack was born in Rock Island on Oct. l2, 1928, to Frank and Edith Wold Dye. He graduated from Rock Island Public Schools, where he enjoyed a variety of work and athletics. He graduated from Augustana College with a degree in history and education. He worked briefly at IBM, but the classroom called, and he returned to start his teaching career at Roosevelt Military Academy in Aledo, soon to move on to the Moline School District, teaching first at John Deere Junior High and later at Moline High School. He loved coaching basketball, golf and tennis and enjoyed the daily challenge of engaging students in timely discussions about the social sciences. He earned his master's degree in administration from Western Illinois University and served as department head for many years in social studies.
Jack was instrumental in starting the Moline Hall of Honor for Moline graduates and recently earned induction into the Illinois Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Fame. His razor wit and rapid-fire delivery coupled with a near-photographic memory were feared and admired throughout the community.
He met the love of his life, Charlotte Joy Shipley, in 1953, and, after a whirlwind courtship, they married on March 20, 1954, in Moline. He raised three true Moliners and several Boston terriers while maintaining his park-like lawn. Jack also kept busy, as was his habit, by working outside of education as well. He loved the Moline downtown and enjoyed working at Ydeen's Men's Wear, where he would hold court and sell quality suits. Jack did not fully embrace retirement and stayed busy volunteering with the Chamber of Commerce, Rotary and Arrowhead Ranch. He also attended countless athletic events of his grandchildren and kept many Moline athletes supplied with special laminated accounts of their achievements. Jack also served as historian of Wharton Field House and co-authored a book with George Van Vooren on the history of Moline basketball. Jack was a lifelong "Dye-hard" Chicago Cub fan and really believed that this could be their year.
Jack is survived by his children and their spouses, Brad and Joanna Dye, Moline, Jeff Dye and Tammie Newvine-Erskine, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and Jodi and Mark Zimmerman, Moline; grand-children, Jared and Derek Dye and Jessica and Jenna Zimmerman; brothers-in-law, Gene Shipley and Ron and Lou Shipley, all of Moline; and several nieces and nephews. He was proceeded in death by his lovely wife, Joy, and brothers, William and Donald Dye.

Jack's family extends thanks and appreciation to the staffs at Heartland Health Care Center and the Wound Care Clinic and invites friends to share stories and condolences and light a free candle in his memory at TrimbleFuneralHomes.com.

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Ruth Chelmstrom Stewart Retiring from Pre-school Teaching

Ruth Chelstrom Stewart, 1966, is retiring.
 after 34 years as a pre-school teacher at
Merry Sunshine Preschool
at Christ United Methodist Church, East Moline.

One ray of Merry Sunshine retires from preschool teaching


EAST MOLINE — Merry Sunshine Preschool will become "Ruth-less" by the end of the month.
Ruth Stewart will end a 34-year teaching career at the preschool at Christ United Methodist Church, 3801 7th St, East Moline. An open house retirement reception will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. at the church Sunday, May 31.
Classes ended Friday, so Mrs. Stewart spent her last week preparing graduation robes and caps for her last class of preschool graduates.
Her impending retirement "hasn't hit me yet," she said. "I'm expecting it will really hit me in September when classes resume."
Her daughter, Gretchen Peters, of Naperville, has promised to take her on a September trip to help get her mind off it, Mrs. Stewart said.
"It's time for me to retire," she said. "I plan to do some fun things, including maybe traveling, but I'm not known as a big traveler."
She's from Moline and never left the area. She went to Black Hawk College in Moline, and has taught at Merry Sunshine since 1981. 
The preschool was created in 1970 by Betty Dahlberg. It rented space from the church for 25 years, before Christ Methodist bought the preschool in 2006. Former colleagues Connie Ellison and Jeanie Hess retired the same year. Teacher Kelly Peterson has closely helped Mrs. Stewart since.
She figures she has taught more than 1,360 students in her 34 years.
"I always enjoyed working with kids and seeing things through their eyes," Mrs. Stewart said. "I"m going to miss it.
"Merry Sunshine has been a wonderful place to work," she said. "With children, something new happens all the time."
She's also met "many beautiful families and many wonderfully supportive people," Mrs. Stewart said.
She advised future teachers to "enjoy every day with the kids and look at life through their eyes," and advised future students to "listen to their teachers, because they do now things."
Mrs. Stewart laughs while remembering once taking kids on a Halloween walk through the neighborhood and lecturing them about not walking through piles of leaves in case some were still smoldering with fire. One little boy looked at her and asked why another teacher was doing exactly that, and Mrs. Stewart turned to look as a colleague's nylons started melting as she walked through a leaf pile. Fortunately, her colleague wasn't hurt.
Mrs. Stewart also fondly remembers how another young lad, upon hearing about her mother's death, came up to her and called her a "lucky person." She was lucky, the boy told her, because it gave her an angel in heaven looking out for her.
She also has felt incredibly lucky to work at Merry Sunshine for this many years.


Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Rest in Peace - David A. Pearson, Married 40 Years to Linda Nelson



David A. Pearson, 66, of Geneseo, passed away Sunday, May 10, 2015 at Unity Point – Trinity in Rock Island.  A funeral service celebrating his life will be at 10:30 am on Thursday, May 14 at First Lutheran Church in Geneseo.  Rev. Dr. Arthur Bergren will officiate.  A visitation for Dave will be held from 5-7 pm on Wednesday at the First Lutheran Church.  Cremation Rites will be accorded following the services.  Memorials may be made to the Fellowship of Christian Athletes or First Lutheran Church.  Vandemore Funeral Homes, Geneseo is assisting the family with arrangements.

Dave was born on November 4, 1948 in Geneseo, IL the son of Dale and Marie (Sassen) Pearson.  He graduated from Geneseo High School in 1966 and attended Western Illinois University.  He was united in marriage to Linda J. Nelson on June 12, 1975 in Rock Island.  Dave proudly served his country in the U.S. Marine Corp.  He was in route sales for Hostess Cakes, Frito Lay, and Farmer Brother Coffee.  Dave then became a security guard for John Deere PDC in Milan, IL for several years.  Dave was an avid, lifelong St. Louis Cardinals fan and loved spending time with his family.

Survivors include his wife Linda; children: Troy Pearson and fiancé Adrienne Carney of Los Angeles, CA, Tammy (Ted) Black of Moline, IL, Ben (Laura) Pearson of Geneseo, IL, Sam (Andrea) Kniss of CA; 9 grandchildren: Richard, Alexis, Brian, Kaylee, Ashton, Callen, David, Maryella, Cameron; brothers: Dennis (Diane) Pearson, Sugarland, TX, Paul (Marty) Pearson, Davenport, IA, Mark (Pat) Pearson, Carlyle, IL, Dan (Gina) Pearson, Geneseo, IL, John (Amy) Pearson, Milwaukee, WI; and sister-in-law and brother in law: Nancy (Roger) Moler, LeClaire, IA.

He was preceded in death by his parents.

Linda uploaded this photo less than a month ago.

Saturday, May 9, 2015

Happy 45th Anniversary - Kathleen Wilcox and George Kapetanakis



Happy 44th anniversary - Kathy Wilcox and George Kapetanakis. May every day be like your wedding day.


This is not The Miracle on 34th Street,
but Kathy with Santa.
Many familiar faces - Garfield, about 1953.

Front row from left: Linda Hicks, Greg Jackson, Kathleen Wilcox, unknown boy, unknown girl, John Schneck, Jack Ries, Ann Pascall. Middle row: George Small, unknown girl, unknown boy, unknown boy, Billie Seasland, unknown girl, Jim McCandless, Jenal Vencus. Back row: Terry Thompson, Tamara Gustus, Bonnie ?, then Jeff Hall on the far right, Cathy Pobanz next to him. The rest are unknown at the moment.

Garfield Brownies

Front row from left: Diane Manley, Linda Hicks, Sue Lennox,
Candy Clark, Kathleen Wilcox;
Middle row: Unknown girl, Debbie Olson, Kathy Pobanz, Jean Ackley,
unknown girl, unknown girl;
Back row: Linda Wiley, Sally Swanson, Bonna Anderburg , unknown girl,
Joann Minch, Diane Ohrendorf.

This looks like the Garfield basement gym, in the old building. The new addition is now about 50 years old, but that included a new gym with ceilings higher than 8 feet.

PTA meetings were often in the old gym. I remember the food being there. I liked those meetings, because I had about 20 different good desserts to pick from. When asked, "Apple or cherry pie?" I said, "Both."

Cub scouts also met at Garfield. I reached Wolf, with one gold and one silver arrow. Stressed out, I dropped to pursue a more fulfilling hobby, reading comic books.

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Tom Gramkow Visits Lawrence Eyre at Grinnel College


Tom Gramkow  and his wife Jane wanted to watch Lawrence Eyre's tennis team play at Grinnell College.

Friday, March 27, 2015

Young Athletes - Courtesy of Steve Gerard


Dick Lingstrom, Bill Ferry, Dan Collins, Dave Lodico, Howard Lingstrom, Bill Serandos
2nd row Bob Erickson, Ken Jacobs,Bruce Soukup, Steve Gerard Gerard, Bill Foley, 
3rd row Bruce Harter, Keith Nargang, Mark Babcock, Paul Carther.


ROW 1 - Manager B. Swanson, J.Culbertson, G. Small, J. Wignall, S. Gerard, M. Rosenberg, Walt Karstens, D. Ausmus, D. Ackerland, Mgr. J. Schneck, 
ROW 2 - Manager J. Kron, R.Ramirez, D. Frazier, J. Ries, J. Prouty, F. Bell, C.Munn, B. Johnson, S. Hall, H. Lindstrom. 
ROW 3 - S. McIntire, D. Coopman, L. Eyre, W. Forgie, K. Nahrgang, J. Hall, A. Efflandt, R. Peterson, ROW 4 - Coach K. Wilt, D. Jones, M. Householder, L. Koile, G. Keller, S. Warren, M. Creen, M. Bisbey, J. Rounds, Coach Miller.


From the PowWow -
John Deere's 9th grade championship team was not one of the biggest, but one of the fastest and hardest as their record of 5-1 proves.John Deere lost its game to Coolidge by a 13-7 margin.The lessons learned from the Coolidge game were well put to useagainst Franklin by defeating them  20-6. Orange, Central, and Washington,were completely shut out. John Deere's last game with Wilson was one everyone wanted to win.The Spartans started the game as underdogs but came out on top with a score of 27-0 to become conference champs.

Happy 33rd Anniversary - Lawrence and Laurie Eyre

Lawrence and Laurie Eyre

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Ideas for the 50th Reunion - MHS66 - The Class the Stars Fell On



Planning will begin soon for the MHS66 50th reunion. The reunion committee has been great in setting up events, decade after decade.

This one will be very special, because we realize how ephemeral life is. I can think of many meetings where I saw a very good friend the last time and never thought of that possibility at the time. "Those were the days, my friend, we thought they'd never end." Larry Easter and Al Davis were at our home in Phoenix, and that was the last time I saw either friend.

I have some ideas, which I was sharing with a classmate, and we thought others might want to get ideas posted early. This will be a sticky post on the left margin, so I can easily add new ideas to the list, as they arrive by email, IM, and NSA intercepts.

Facebook has a page for sharing 2016 reunions ideas, too. Just click on this sentence.

Here are some ideas:

  1. We have always gathered at the Moline bar, but not everyone is keen on the noise and booze, so we should have an alternative place designated in advance. such as Whitey's on 23rd Avenue and 16th Street. 
  2. We have lost many classmates already, so it would be good to recognize those friends in a memorial service.
  3. Many big gatherings have a professional photography setup, where people can pose for a formal portrait as a keepsake and purchase them. 
  4. I will volunteer to pull together a photo book of the reunion, with some past photos, and publish it as a full color PDF on Lulu.com - free.
  5. From Kris Streed -  I would really like to go someplace nice. I've mentioned it before, but the hotel next to TGIFriday's would be a nice place for the happy hour event. I know other class reunions have had their gatherings there and everyone was quite complimentary. I understand it would be more expensive, but I wouldn't mind paying a little more for quality. Besides, it is actually IN Moline.

Please read the sign when exiting Whitey's.
Thanks.

Friday, March 6, 2015

Interview with Lawrence Eyre

Lawrence Eyre teaches tennis at Grinnell College now.
Think about this story, which Lawrence shared with us.

Laurie Eyre still coaches at Maharishi.

Zen master, Ivy League alum, tennis guru: Grinnell assistant men’s and women’s tennis coach Lawrence Eyre does not lack when it comes to job titles. The S&B recently sat down with Eyre to discuss all things from collegiate tennis to transcendental meditation and his grueling commute.
Could you give a short summery of your career so far?
Well, I’ve been teaching tennis since 1966. I’ve taught over 15,000 people how to play the game. And I’ve stuck with it because I enjoy teaching and I love tennis. I spent 25 years as a high school coach, founded a program for boys and girls that did real well locally in the state of Iowa.

So you were part of a group that founded the Maharishi School?
My wife Laurie and I were among the five or six founding faculty in 1981 and graduated our first class in 1983. We taught for over 30 years there and Laurie is still going.
Could you explain the meditation method that you use?
Transcendental meditation is very simple, very natural and it doesn’t involve concentration or contemplation. It is a mental technique which allows the body and the mind to experience a sense of restful alertness, very profound rest, without any focus required. A child who is a fourth grader could learn it just as well [as] a professor.
Do you bring your meditation practices to the Grinnell team?
I certainly have not made it a point to ask people to meditate. Tennis stands on its own. But the record is pretty clear from [the Maharishi School]. Being the smallest school in the state of Iowa that had a tennis team, but winning seventeen state championships, that there is something going on. I like to think it is the releasing of stress, the dissolving of fatigue and strain that helps people be more alert and able to take what the coach offers by way of correction or improvement suggestions and put them into practice.
Very cool, so did you play tennis yourself?
I did play at Yale. I played at Moline High School [in Illinois] and was a Quad City champion at singles and doubles and qualified for the state tournament in Illinois for two years. I was offered a Division 1 scholarship at Illinois State. But as soon as I got an academic scholarship at Yale, it took me about four tenths of a seconds to sign that one.
So what brought you to Grinnell?
Well really, it was good fortune I think. I was reflecting on this with Andy [Hamilton ’85, men’s and women’s head tennis coach]. In the high school state tournament in any number of years it was just Maharishi versus Grinnell High School. And Will Hamilton ’17 and Charlie Wilhelm ’15 both played against us, played wonderfully against us, but our school won. So I didn’t know if I’d be welcome when I came. But people have been so receptive, from all the team members to Andy.
Finally, are there key difference between coaching high school and coaching college, both talent-wise and personality-wise?
Yes. And I am happy for the change. Because after 25 years [at the Maharishi School] what I reached was a point where there were kids on team whose parents had been on my first class. And I said, “I’ve seen that backhand before. I’ve seen the problem with that backhand before.” It was a wonderful experience, but I wanted a new metabolism. So, it’s a delight for me when we go to different venues to see all the Grinnell kids studying. We talk about knowledge in the van, which reminds me of my own experience at Yale. People who value learning and they value the contrast, the balancing contrast that the dynamism of tennis can offer.


Tennis Coach of the Year.

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Jann Carl Takes the Ultimate Selfie

Jann Carl began her journalism career with
an article on the Niabi Zoo for the Moline High School Line O Type.

Rest in Peace - Karen Griffith - MHS66

Rest in peace - Karen - our classmate.
Our group is diminishing.

Karen Griffith Obituary

Karen Griffith Billman, 67, of Dumfries, Va., passed away Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, at INOVA Hospital, Fairfax, Va., after a brief illness.
Funeral services will be 11 a.m. Saturday, March 7, at Dumfries United Methodist Church, where Karen was a member. Memorials may be made to the church. Miller Funeral Home, Woodbridge, Va., is in charge of arrangements.
Karen Kay Griffith was born Feb. 19, 1948, in Moline, the daughter of Harold and Mildred Schiess Griffith. She graduated from Moline High School in 1966 and from Illinois State University in 1970. She married Joe Billman on March 23, 1974, in Moline.

Left to cherish her memory are her husband, Joe; daughter, Katie (William) Johnson, Richmond, Va.; granddaughter, Eleanor Johnson, Richmond; mother, Mildred Griffith, Moline; sisters, Gloria (Stephen) Wisley and Joline (Steven) Schroder; brothers, John Griffith and Jeffrey (Pam) Griffith; four nieces and three nephews. Karen was preceded in death by her son, Andrew in 2013, and her father.

Friday, February 27, 2015

Spock Told Moliner Ken Berry To Try Hollywood - From the 2010 Post



"Go West, young man."
Yes - that is my Photoshop.


When his hitch was up in 1955, Ken was looking for the logical next move. "My sergeant in Atlanta was Leonard Nimoy, from ‘Star Trek,’" Ken recalls. "Leonard said, ‘You really ought to contact some people on the coast since you’re going back out there.’ He set it up and I got a screen test. I didn’t get the job but it got me to California." (The film was Francis in the Haunted House and at the last minute Mickey Rooney got the job of essentially succeeding Donald O’Connor in what turned out to be the last of the "Francis the Talking Mule" films.)
Ken Berry Official Website

Monday, February 23, 2015

Happy Birthday Jeff Hall

Jeff Hall and Patty Puck met at Garfield Grade School,
but Patty hastens to add they were not dating at that time.

Marriage.

Family gathered for the birthday party.
Shocking fact - Jeff never took gym at Moline High.
He lettered in sports instead: basketball, football, track, hockey, lacrosse.

Saturday, February 21, 2015

Michael Blaser, MHS 65, Famous Military and Marine Artist

Michael Blaser's website shows how versatile he is
how talented in his depictions of boats and ships.

.


Greg McCluskey:
Marine Veteran, Michael Blaser, painted this cover for us. He is a member of VVA Quad CitiesChapter 299.


Peggy Taylor:
Michael Blaser is an amazing artist from the Quad Cities. I am honored to have been a classmate of his class of 1965 Moline HS. He is known for great marine works.


So, now you have seen a cross section of what I have done with my life and talents. I hope it pleases your profile of what is good in the painted arts. I have painted river ports, riverboats, deep water ports and ocean going vessels all my life. In the last few years I've been working on commissions from patrons who like how I handle a brush. I may have an insight that just may create an itch for the collector that only I can scratch. If I collected art I would want to work with an artist that had a defined passion to do a certain thing. I'd give him the money he needs, then stand back and watch him go that extra mile. Often, people pay me to paint what they want. This works to a certain level, but my finest works come from an idea that I am on fire to paint. If you'll take the time to read on I think that fire will warm your imagination and hopefully you will call me and then we can talk over in detail about why I have this particular fire to paint.

When you really look at a painting, you can see through the minds eye of the painter. On the same level creative writers craft an image that frees your imagination and places you inside a literary art work so fresh that you feel the warmth of the sun or smell the breeze blowing over the river. The art collector, the reader and the historian spend lifetimes looking for the treasures scattered among the weeds of the ages. Such an American treasure was Captain Frederick Way Jr. He was a unique American riverboat captain, writer and historian. I have excerpted for you just in one paragraph he wrote about a steamboat named the QUEEN CITY. She ran the Ohio river during the first third of the 20th Century. I would like you to read this and stay with me while I tie the threads into a fine rope for you.

"Your scribe fell for the wiles of the QUEEN CITY in 1911 standing in the forward end of the cabin gazing aft at her multitude of repititions; repitition of doors, of shining brass oil lamps in their swinging brackets, of overhead lights coming from twined oak leaves of metal, of chairs soldiered in parade, and her dining tables the same way - all of these things as trim as West Point cadets, sweeping in a dip downward to the mid-ship gangways, then up again to the immense mirror in the distance - an unbelievable distance - twice as wonderful as anything military; a person could wear out his eyes looking for a single straight line; there wasn't one anywhere; all was cadence and curve, an immense arc. A lady at the grand piano played. She sang in a dusky voice "Oh Beautiful Lady" and "Chocolate Soldier." She had too much powder and paint for my mother's standards, but I thought she was a blessed angel, and shall expect all honest angels to resemble her in the Hereafter. I was 10 years old when this indelible tattoo creased my imagination. The QUEEN CITY did this to adults as well, so I learned later".

There are literary pearls among his books that exhibit the wisdom of a man who stood the deck then had the intellectual depth to record these experiences in his own words for us. He left us an image of America that has passed to the ages. I knew Cap Way at the end of his life. By then he was bent over and small. His hands were twisted from arthritis. We talked of the usual things but he looked at me once, over his little reader glasses, his eyes kind of lit up and said to me quite out of context that I had a "part to play down the road". Now I think I understand what he had in mind and here is where the three threads come together to make a fine rope.

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An Artist’s Salute

Fran Riley Feature: Bettendorf’s Michael Blaser is recognized nationally for his maritime art. He's also accomplished in military art.


What many people might not realize is Blaser paints military art. One of his paintings  is on the most recent cover of the VVA Veteran Magazine. The magazine is a tribute to Vietnam Veterans.
Blaser’s work features Army General Creighton Abrams and Navy Admiral Elmo Zumwalt. They formed a coordinated effort to thwart the enemy along rivers in Vietnam. Blaser’s work has appeared twice on the Veteran Magazine cover. Michael served for two years in the Marines.

He also did a montage honoring  his high school friend Army Master Sergeant John F. Baker. Baker attended Moline High and received the Medal of Honor for his heroism during the Vietnam War.
Blaser also builds and paints model ships. He especially likes Navy ships because of how much they meant to our country’s success and survival.

An artist’s military salute! A tribute to the men and women who defend our freedom!